Information Research Assignment-Answer

Information Research Assignment semester 2_2018
Research Methods, School of Science

Name:
Program: [Hons, Grad. Dip., Masters by Coursework]
Discipline:
Supervisor / relevant discipline lecturer:
Email:

Assignment Due Date: Monday 20 August 2018
Add your answers in black font in the shaded boxes provided. Do not delete any of the text and images of the assignment. Save the assignment as : family name_your given name_InfoRes_2018_2.doc (not as .docx) and submit via Canvas.
School Liaison Librarians:
School of Science: [email protected]
School of Health & Biomedical Sciences: [email protected]
Please contact your Liaison Librarian if you need assistance at any stage of the library assignment. To allow for an adequate response be sure to make contact well before the due date of the assignment.

All questions must be completed satisfactorily to pass the library component of the course.
How long will it take?
Suggested schedule for off campus students based on face-to-face information research methods classes:
Week 1 – look through the Online Tutorial and find the Subject Guide relevant to your discipline. Check the Science Subject Guide list and the Biomedical, Health & Nursing list. If you are a Masters by Coursework student who is not currently working on a research project, ask a lecturer for advice on a realistic topic to use for this assignment. It is fine to re-use a topic from a previous course.
Week 2 – work through Q1, Q2 and Q4.3 (Staying Current)
Week 3 – Q3, Q4.1 and Q4.2.
Week 4 – Q5

Q.1

1.1 Briefly explain your research topic (50-150 words)
If your project has several stages outline them briefly and indicate which stage you will be focusing on for the assignment.

Q1.1 The topic is to conduct a review on the analytical techniques coupled with
chemometrics in ascertaining the authentication and the toxicity level
(mycotoxins) of the herbs and spices. The review will be conducted using various evaluation tools that determine the toxic levels (mainly quantitative) of different herbs and spices, based on their origin and growing regions. The study will be essential for identifying effective tools that help in measuring toxic levels and the possibilities for edible and helpful qualities along with authentication of the constituents present in the herb and spices.

1.2 Identify the main aspects of your topic and list the keywords for each aspect. Include synonyms, alternative terms, plurals, and acronyms where appropriate. A preliminary search of a relevant journal article database can be helpful for identifying these. The Library’s Subject Guides also list useful dictionaries and encyclopaedias.

Quick guide to completing this question:
• Read through 1.Define Your Topic and 2. Identify Keywords in Developing a Search Statement in the Online Tutorial.

Q1.2
Aspects: Mycotoxins, Chemometrics, authentications of herbs, toxicity levels

Keywords: measuring mycotoxins of spices and herbs, evaluate the authentication of herbs, experimental tools for measuring toxicity levels, Chemometrics in mycotoxins

1.3 Convert your list of keywords into a search statement. Use the Boolean operators (AND and OR), the asterix * for truncation, and double quotes ” ” for phrases.

Quick guide:
• Read through 3. Search Operators and 4. The Search Statement

• Examples of how you might fill out Aspects 1-3 (below) for three different topics are provided below:

Example 1
Aspect 1

spider* or arachnid*
AND Aspect 2

web or silk or fiber* or fibre* or thread
AND Aspect 3

nmr or “nuclear magnetic resonance”

Example 2
Aspect 1

doping or drug*
AND Aspect 2

sport* or athlet*
AND Aspect 3

biomarker* or “biological marker*”
Example 3

Aspect 1

water or aquatic or aqueous
AND Aspect 2

“high performance liquid chromatography” or hplc
AND Aspect 3

triazin* or atrazine*

IMPORTANT: Only use phrases for terms in common use (eg. “biological marker*”). Do not search using sentences/phrases generally. A reminder from the Online Tutorial:

Q1.3
Aspect 1

“Analytical process” AND mycotoxins*

Aspect 2

“Analytical process” AND chemometrics*

Aspect 3 (if you have a third aspect to your search)
“authentication of plants”

Which operator/s would you use between Aspect 1-3 above? ie. To link each box (the question does not refer to operator/s within each box)

Select the appropriate Boolean operator using the Underline function in Word

AND OR NOT

Q.2

2.1. List the two Library journal article databases most useful for this topic
Refer to the Subject Guide for your discipline for a list of relevant databases.
• Do not select LibrarySearch as this is not a journal article database listed in the Subject Guides.
• Although Web of Science is a valuable database, do not use it for Q2 of the assignment since it does not use Keywords for classification.

Quick guide:
• 1. What is a Database in Searching Databases

Q2.1

Your subject guide:

Biological and Agricultural Index
AGRICOLA
SciFinder Scholar
Your selected journal article databases:

1. SCOPUS (Elsevier)

2. PubMed

2.2 Search one or two of the databases to find two articles helpful to your topic.

Quick guide to 2.2:
• If you are new to database searching, view the tutorials that are relevant to you on 2. Getting Started.

Provide a screen capture of the database record for each article. Include title / author / abstract / subject terms. Ensure these are fully visible.

Subject terms are particularly important. These may be labelled Indexed Keywords / Index Terms / Descriptors / Controlled Terms / MeSH terms. (in PubMed click on MeSH terms to open the list).

The green box in the screen capture below is for your reference. There is no need to include a similar box in your image.
NOTE: Include Indexed Keywords if available, not just Author Keywords. Only Indexed Keywords are consistent across the database.

Indicate which database was used. Ensure the screen captures are from the journal article databases (Scopus, PubMed etc) not from the full text of the article.

Eg.

Q2.2
1st Article

2nd article

2.3 Copy and paste (ie. not screen capture) the subject terms that appear in the database records of your two articles.

Subject terms may be labelled keywords / index terms / descriptors / controlled terms (eg. In the Scopus record in the example above they are labelled Indexed keywords). Author keywords may also be relevant. For SciFinder include CA Concept Headings.

Use Word highlight to identify subject terms worth trying in your search.

Eg.

Article 1 –

Indexed keywords

GEOBASE Subject Index: agricultural land; catchment; cropping practice; ecosystem resilience; environmental impact; fertilizer application; herbicide; horticulture; livestock farming; marine pollution; nitrogen; pesticide; pollutant; pollutant transport; runoff; sustainable development; water quality

Regional Index: Auckland; Great Barrier Island; New Zealand; North Island

Article 2 –

Indexed keywords

GEOBASE Subject Index: agricultural practice; anthropogenic effect; catchment; coastal zone management; coral reef; habitat conservation; habitat fragmentation; human activity

Regional Index: Australia; Coral Sea; Great Barrier Reef; Pacific Ocean; Queensland

If you have problems pasting text into the box below, try File – Paste – Paste Special –
Formatted Text (RTF)
Q2.3
Article 1:
Author keywords
Alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) algorithmCerealLiquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)Multi-way calibration methodMycotoxin
Indexed keywords
EMTREE drug terms: aflatoxinalpha zearalenolmycotoxinochratoxinsterigmatocystinT 2 toxinzearalanone
EMTREE medical terms: algorithmalternating trilinear decomposition algorithmanalytic methodArticlecalibrationcerealchemical structurechemometric analysiselliptical joint confidence region testextractionf igures of meritimmunoaffinity column purification stepinterference free analysislimit of detectionliquid chromatography-mass spectrometrymaizematrix effectmeasurement accuracymeasurement repeatabilitynonhumanphysical chemistryprocess optimizationquantitative analysisreliabilityreproducibilityricestatistical parameterstoxin analysis
Article 2:
Indexed keywords
EMTREE drug terms: herbaceous agent
EMTREE medical terms: Articlecomparative studyconsensuscontrolled studyDNA barcodingDNA extractionDNA libraryDNA sequencedrug contaminationdrug marketingdrug puritydrug qualityGenBankherbal medicineherbal product authenticationIndiameasurement accuracymedicinal plantpolymerase chain reactionpriority journalsequence analysisspeciesDNA barcodingdrug contaminationgeneticshumanphytotherapyquality controlreference valuestandards
MeSH: DNA Barcoding, TaxonomicDrug ContaminationHumansIndiaPhytotherapyPlants, MedicinalQuality ControlReference Values

2.4 Using the results and keyword information (from Q2.3) that you have obtained so far, improve on your original search to get the best possible coverage of your topic. This means using the Q2.3 keywords in your search/s and adapting your search/s depending on whether you are getting too many results or too few results. You may adapt your search from Q.1 or, if necessary, break it down into more than one search.

IMPORTANT: If your best search only retrieves, for example, five references closely related to your topic, what other searching will you do to retrieve relevant references for your thesis bibliography?

If SciFinder is relevant to your discipline, additionally indicate how you adapted your Boolean search statement for SciFinder (e.g. how did you break up the search, use Refine, Analyse, etc.)

Quick guide to 2.4:
• 3. Preliminary Searching, 4. Too Many Results and 5. Too Few Results in Searching Databases

Eg:

Below are three examples of how to approach this question.

Example 1 from Scopus:

Treatment of brain tissue colonization by T. gondii

First attempts:

TITLE-ABS-KEY ( “toxoplasma gondii” ) AND TITLE-ABS-KEY ( “blood brain barrier” ) = 66 results

TITLE-ABS-KEY ( “toxoplasma gondii” ) AND TITLE-ABS-KEY ( “blood brain barrier” ) AND TITLE-ABS-KEY ( treatment ) = 18 results

After noting and including additional keywords:

TITLE-ABS-KEY ( “toxoplasma gondii” OR toxoplasmosis ) AND TITLE-ABS-KEY ( “blood brain barrier” or cerebral ) = 2,400 results

Limited two of the aspects to KEYWORD only from the drop down box in order to be more precise:

KEY ( “toxoplasma gondii” OR toxoplasmosis ) AND TITLE-ABS-KEY ( “blood brain barrier” OR cerebral ) AND KEY ( treatment ) = 265 results

Example 2 from Scopus:

Disease-related food contamination in the pork production chain and its detection

TITLE-ABS-KEY ( pig* OR swine OR porcine ) AND TITLE-ABS-KEY ( parasite* OR disease* ) AND TITLE-ABS-KEY ( “food contamination” ) = 1069 results

Limited to Document Type – Review = 161 results.

Returned to the 1000 results and opened up Keyword in the left hand column. After seeing the list of official Keywords, returned to the original search and changed all the search aspects to KEYWORD only.

KEY ( pig* OR swine OR porcine ) AND KEY ( parasite* OR disease* ) AND KEY ( “food contamination” ) = 878 results

Limited to Subject Area – Agricultural and Biological Sciences = 251 results

Limited to Document Type – Articles = 216 results. This is a manageable number to scan.

Additional search:
KEY ( pork ) AND KEY ( “food contamination” ) AND TITLE-ABS-KEY ( identification OR detection ) = 157 results

Example 3 – Searching in SciFinder: refer to the example given in the SciFinder box at Getting Started in the Online Tutorial.

NOTE: These are just examples. The necessary search strategies will vary according to the topic.

To answer this question, insert a database screen capture of your search history to confirm your steps and the number of results. In Scopus the search history will appear at the bottom of the search page. If necessary add an explanation of any decisions you made while searching. Add any explanation under the screen capture. Eg. of a Search History from Scopus (appears at the bottom of the search page):

Q2.4
Article 1:

Article 2:

Q.3

3.1 Critically analyse one of your two articles. Use the same article for all parts of Q3.

Quick guide:

Use the following criteria to assign your evaluation scores below.

Relevancy – eg. How effective were the search statement keywords? Does the article completely cover the topic? How useful is it?
Currency – eg. How up-to-date is the article? Is there likely to be current information on this topic?
Authority – eg. Has the article undergone peer review by a group of subject experts prior to publication? (If in doubt about peer review – also called refereeing – check Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory). What is the Web of Science Journal Impact Factor for the journal? How many papers has the first author written in the subject area? What is their H-index?

Q3.1

Full author, title etc details of your article:
Liu, Z., Wu, H.L., Xie, L.X., Hu, Y., Fang, H., Sun, X.D., Wang, T., Xiao, R. and Yu, R.Q., 2017, Chemometrics-enhanced liquid chromatography-full scan-mass spectrometry for interference-free analysis of multi-class mycotoxins in complex cereal samples. Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, 160, pp.125-138.

Evaluation scores (Use the Underline function to select the number; 1=lowest, 5=highest):
Relevancy 1 2 3 4 5
Currency 1 2 3 4 5
Authority 1 2 3 4 5

Q3.1
What is the Journal Impact Factor of your journal?

What is your journal’s rank in the relevant Journal Citation Reports subject category?

Quick guide:
• What is a Journal Impact Factor? View the flash tutorial ‘The Impact Factor in Journal Citation Reports’ at Working With Your Search Results – Evaluation
• To look up your journal, select Web of Science. (This database will also appear in your Subject Guide or the Library Databases A-Z listing).
• Within Web of Science link to Journal Citation Reports from the top navigation bar.
• Enter a Journal Name
• The journal’s record now defaults to Current Year, change this to All Years to view the page shown in the class video.
• The Key Indicators box will display the Journal Impact Factor
• To view the journal’s rank in various disciplines, select Rank from the left hand menu

Journal Impact Factor in JCR Web of Science:

Insert screen capture from JCR, eg:

Journal Rank in relevant subject Category:

Insert screen capture from JCR, eg:

Q3.1
First Author H-index via Web of Science Core Collection:

List the steps you took to correctly identify your author – eg. Selecting Research Area/s, Organization/s, removing irrelevant articles above the H index number (In the example below, only articles above line 86 need to be by Elizabeth Blackburn).
Including this information is particularly important if the author has a common name.

Insert a screen capture from Web of Science which includes the search summary at the top of the page (ie.You searched for) as well as the top 5 or 6 articles (to demonstrate that they are from the same researcher), eg:

Quick guide:
• What is the H index?
View the flash tutorial ‘WEB OF SCIENCE: Citation Reports & H index’ at Working With Your Search Results – Evaluation

Step by Step instructions for Web of Science:
• Within Web of Science check that Web of Science Core Collection is selected.

• The Search default is Basic Search. Click on + More to select Author Search.

• Enter Author Name details

• If your Author name is an Asian name enter the full name eg. Shin, Jae-Sun in the Last Name / Family Name field and leave the Initial(s) field blank.

• You can then select Research Domain and further open up the Research Domain subject categories to select specific disciplines.

• There is also the option to limit to a particular Organization. You can leave this unspecified if you are not certain of the author’s affiliation history. There will be a broader option to limit to a specific country once the results are displaying (Select View All Options from the left hand side of the results list).

• Click on Finish Search then try clicking on the link at Author Search Results: XX Records XX Article Groups (top left hand side). This will often allow you to retrieve using the author’s given name. Select entries for your author (there may be more than one) and click on View Records.

• Select Create Citation Report (top right hand corner of the page) to view the H index.

• Note that only the papers appearing above the H index cut off point need to be by your author to generate a correct H index. (eg. H index of 5 means you only have to check the first 5 papers). To remove papers that do not appear to be by your author check the box next to the paper and select Go.

If you are still having problems due to a common name try Scopus:
• Within Scopus change the search default from Article Title, Abstract, Keywords to Article Title.
• Type in the title of your key article and use double quotes to treat the title as a phrase.
• In the article record follow the author name link for the first author of the article.
• The author’s Scopus record, with their Scopus H index will display.
• (Note that this simple method does not work in Web of Science. Sometimes there can also problems with Scopus).

3.2 Referring to the criteria explain why your article is a key reference for your work (100-200 words).
The article is essential in understanding the concept of Chemometrics, the assisted analytical strategy combining LC MS, another mass spectrometry detection procedure based on the ALTD algorithm, which is highly useful in determining class of mycotoxins. Rather this article makes it easier for using tools for quantifying of mycotoxins, the backbone of our current research. The various stages with the correct form of evaluation is well illustrated in this articles and the ways in which the toxin levels within cereals and plants can be analysed have been described with examples in this article.

3.3 Using either Web of Science, Scopus or SciFinder, check your key article for Citing References. How many times has your article been cited by other articles?

Insert a screen capture from your database

Eg from Web of Science:

Quick guide:
• What are Citing References? Read through Searching Databases: 6. Cited Reference Searching

Q.4
4.1 Theses
Find one thesis relevant to your research that you can use as background information.

Quick guide:
• Searching Databases: 7. Other Sources of Information. There is a Thesis information box on this page.
• More in-depth information is available in the Theses guide.
• If you have difficulty finding something relevant remember to search more broadly and try Dissertations and Theses Global (Proquest) which is a large database of US theses.

IMPORTANT: Check that your thesis is a thesis. Not everything appearing in the RMIT Research Repository or Trove is a thesis.

IMPORTANT: The full text of the thesis has to be available in order for it to be a thesis that is helpful to you. See below for the required screen capture.

Q4.1
Author and Title details of postgraduate thesis:

Thesis database/catalogue used to locate the thesis:

Insert screen captures of the record for your thesis which display the Author, Title, Thesis type, University and pdf availability. If using Dissertations and Theses Full Text (Proquest) Two screen captures will be required. See examples below.

egs. from Proquest:

eg. from the RMIT Research Repository:

Q4.1
Explain how the thesis is relevant to your own research question. (50-100 words)
This thesis is essential in understanding one of the most commonly used methods for analysing chemical components of herbs, named as Thin layer chromatography (TLC). Rather this thesis presents the ways of conducting quantitative and qualitative analyses with scanning densitometric techniques of CAMAG and TLCQA method.

4.2 Books and Patents
Locate either a book or a patent relevant to your research in some way.

To locate a book use either LibrarySearch to search RMIT Library or use Libraries Australia

Quick guide:
• In some Subject Guides there is a list of book subject headings under the Books tab that may be useful.
• If there are no subject headings in your Subject Guide, or they are too broad, search LibrarySearch using keywords instead.

To find a patent relevant to your work use the Patents sources listed in your Subject Guide or check the Patents guide. (Note: if your Subject Guide does not have a Patents tab then patents may not be relevant to you).

Quick guide:
• When searching the United States Patent and Trademark Office, select Advanced Search and limit your keywords to the title and abstract of the patent by using this format:
ttl,abst/((tumor$ or anticancer) and (marine or sponge))

Note: In the US Patents Office database $ replaces *

Q4.2
Details (author, title etc) of book or patent:

Insert a screen capture of the Details view of your book, OR, insert a screen capture of your patent record.

Book eg. from LibrarySearch:
• To bring up the Details view, click on the correct book title from the matching hits list and when the title’s record is displaying, select Details from the left hand column.

Patent eg. from the US Patent and Trademark Office:

Q4.2
Explain how the content of the book or patent assists you with your research. (50-100 words)
The book helps in understanding the techniques widely used in mass spectrometry, which is essential to identify the toxic levels and chemical attributes, along with the quality of the food. Rather this book illustrates the technique for classifying the herbs and food plants.

4.3 Staying Current
Plan a current awareness strategy to keep your research up-to-date and to stay aware of developments in your field.

List at least three different options that you are using to stay current. Give details in terms of your own topic.

Shorten the keywords and mention exact phases to get relevant sources

Quick guide:
• The different options are listed at Working With Your Search Results: Staying Current

Additional information on setting up alerts (NOTE that setting up search alerts is only one option)

Step by Step instructions for saving a search and setting up an alert in Web of Science Core Collection:
• To save a search you have done in Web of Science as a search alert, select Search History – Save History/Create Alert. After registering, provide a Search History Name and tick Email Alerts, then make a selection at Alert type, E-mail format and E-mail frequency.
• To see what you have set up, select My Tools on the Search page. If it says Alerting Status: Off, click on the Activate tab. Note the expiry date of your alert.

Step by Step instructions for saving a search and setting up an alert in Scopus:
• To save a search you have done in Scopus as a search alert, select Set Alert which appears at the top of the page when the search results are displaying, then, register with Scopus if you are not already registered.
• Select Set Alert again, select Frequency and click on Select Alert to confirm.
• Select Alerts from the top bar to view what you have set up, and to delete if necessary

Step by Step instructions for saving a search and setting up an alert in Inspec:
• To save a search you have done in Inspec as a search alert, select Create Alert then Register with Inspec.
• Select Alerts from the top to view what you have set up.

Q.5

5.1 Compile a reference list using the two journal article references found in Q.2 and the thesis and book/patent reference from Q.4.

Beltrán, E., Ibáñez, M., Portolés, T., Ripollés, C., Sancho, J.V., Yusà, V., Marín, S. & Hernández, F. 2013, “Development of sensitive and rapid analytical methodology for food analysis of 18 mycotoxins included in a total diet study”, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 783, pp. 39-48.
Bräse, S., Encinas, A., Keck, J. & Nising, C.F. 2009, “Chemistry and biology of mycotoxins and related fungal metabolites”, Chemical reviews, vol. 109, no. 9, pp. 3903-3990.
Bro, R. & Kiers, H.A.L. 2003, “A new efficient method for determining the number of components in PARAFAC models”, Journal of Chemometrics, vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 274-286.
Campone, L., Piccinelli, A.L., Celano, R. & Rastrelli, L. 2011, “Application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of aflatoxins B 1, B 2, G 1 and G 2 in cereal products”, Journal of Chromatography A, vol. 1218, no. 42, pp. 7648-7654.
Chen, Z.-., Liu, Z., Cao, Y.-. & Yu, R.-. 2001, “Efficient way to estimate the optimum number of factors for trilinear decomposition”, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 444, no. 2, pp. 295-307.
Desmarchelier, A., Tessiot, S., Bessaire, T., Racault, L., Fiorese, E., Urbani, A., Chan, W.-., Cheng, P. & Mottier, P. 2014, “Combining the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe approach and clean-up by immunoaffinity column for the analysis of 15 mycotoxins by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry”, Journal of Chromatography A, vol. 1337, pp. 75-84.
Drejer Storm, I.M.L., Rasmussen, R.R. & Rasmussen, P.H. 2014, “Occurrence of Pre- and Post-Harvest Mycotoxins and Other Secondary Metabolites in Danish Maize Silage”, Toxins, vol. 6, no. 8, pp. 2256-2269.
Dzuman, Z., Zachariasova, M., Lacina, O., Veprikova, Z., Slavikova, P. & Hajslova, J. 2014, “A rugged high-throughput analytical approach for the determination and quantification of multiple mycotoxins in complex feed matrices”, Talanta, vol. 121, pp. 263-272.
Ediage, E.N., Di Mavungu, J.D., Monbaliu, S., Van Peteghem, C. & De Saeger, S. 2011, “A validated multianalyte LC-MS/MS method for quantification of 25 mycotoxins in cassava flour, peanut cake and maize samples”, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 59, no. 10, pp. 5173-5180.
González, A.G., Herrador, M.A. & Asuero, A.G. 1999, “Intra-laboratory testing of method accuracy from recovery assays”, Talanta, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 729-736.
Gu, H.-., Wu, H.-., Li, S.-., Yin, X.-., Hu, Y., Xia, H., Fang, H., Yu, R.-., Yang, P.-. & Lu, H.-. 2016, “Chemometrics-enhanced full scan mode of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of six co-eluted sulfonylurea-type oral antidiabetic agents in complex samples”, Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, vol. 155, pp. 62-72.
Gu, H.-., Wu, H.-., Yin, X.-., Li, Y., Liu, Y.-., Xia, H., Zhang, S.-., Jin, Y.-., Sun, X.-., Yu, R.-., Yang, P.-. & Lu, H.-. 2014, “Multi-targeted interference-free determination of ten β-blockers in human urine and plasma samples by alternating trilinear decomposition algorithm-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in full scan mode: Comparison with multiple reaction monitoring”, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 848, pp. 10-24.
Gu, H.-., Wu, H.-., Yin, X.-., Li, Y., Liu, Y.-., Xia, H., Zhang, S.-., Jin, Y.-., Sun, X.-., Yu, R.-., Yang, P.-. & Lu, H.-. 2014, “Multi-targeted interference-free determination of ten β-blockers in human urine and plasma samples by alternating trilinear decomposition algorithm-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in full scan mode: Comparison with multiple reaction monitoring”, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 848, pp. 10-24.
Hussein, H.S. & Brasel, J.M. 2001, “Toxicity, metabolism, and impact of mycotoxins on humans and animals”, Toxicology, vol. 167, no. 2, pp. 101-134.
Koesukwiwat, U., Sanguankaew, K. & Leepipatpiboon, N. 2014, “Evaluation of a modified QuEChERS method for analysis of mycotoxins in rice”, Food Chemistry, vol. 153, pp. 44-51.
Kong, W.-., Li, J.-., Qiu, F., Wei, J.-., Xiao, X.-., Zheng, Y. & Yang, M.-. 2013, “Development of a sensitive and reliable high performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection for high-throughput analysis of multi-class mycotoxins in Coix seed”, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 799, pp. 68-76.
Kong, W.-., Li, J.-., Qiu, F., Wei, J.-., Xiao, X.-., Zheng, Y. & Yang, M.-. 2013, “Development of a sensitive and reliable high performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection for high-throughput analysis of multi-class mycotoxins in Coix seed”, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 799, pp. 68-76.
Liu, Z., Wu, H.-., Gu, H.-., Yin, X.-., Xie, L.-., Hu, Y., Xia, H., Xiang, S.-. & Yu, R.-. 2016, “Interference-free analysis of aflatoxin B1 and G1 in various foodstuffs using trilinear component modeling of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence data enhanced through photochemical derivatization”, RSC Advances, vol. 6, no. 31, pp. 25850-25863.
Luna, A.S., Luiz, R.A., Lima, I.C.A., Março, P.H., Valderrama, P., Boqué, R. & Ferré, J. 2013, “Simultaneous determination of aflatoxins B2 and G2 in peanuts using spectrofluorescence coupled with parallel factor analysis”, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 778, pp. 9-14.
Olivieri, A.C. 2014, “Analytical figures of merit: From univariate to multiway calibration”, Chemical reviews, vol. 114, no. 10, pp. 5358-5378.
Pereira, V.L., Fernandes, J.O. & Cunha, S.C. 2014, “Mycotoxins in cereals and related foodstuffs: A review on occurrence and recent methods of analysis”, Trends in Food Science and Technology, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 96-136.
Pierce, K.M., Kehimkar, B., Marney, L.C., Hoggard, J.C. & Synovec, R.E. 2012, “Review of chemometric analysis techniques for comprehensive two dimensional separations data”, Journal of Chromatography A, vol. 1255, pp. 3-11.
Ren, Y., Zhang, Y., Shao, S., Cai, Z., Feng, L., Pan, H. & Wang, Z. 2007, “Simultaneous determination of multi-component mycotoxin contaminants in foods and feeds by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry”, Journal of Chromatography A, vol. 1143, no. 1-2, pp. 48-64.
Richard, J.L. 2007, “Some major mycotoxins and their mycotoxicoses-An overview”, International journal of food microbiology, vol. 119, no. 1-2, pp. 3-10.
Richard, J.L. 2007, “Some major mycotoxins and their mycotoxicoses-An overview”, International journal of food microbiology, vol. 119, no. 1-2, pp. 3-10.
Rodríguez, M.C., Sánchez, G.H., Sobrero, M.S., Schenone, A.V. & Marsili, N.R. 2013, “Determination of mycotoxins (aflatoxins and ochratoxin A) using fluorescence emission-excitation matrices and multivariate calibration”, Microchemical Journal, vol. 110, pp. 480-484.
Sulyok, M., Berthiller, F., Krska, R. & Schuhmacher, R. 2006, “Development and validation of a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric method for the determination of 39 mycotoxins in wheat and maize”, Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, vol. 20, no. 18, pp. 2649-2659.
Sun, W., Han, Z., Aerts, J., Nie, D., Jin, M., Shi, W., Zhao, Z., De Saeger, S., Zhao, Y. & Wu, A. 2015, “A reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of multiple mycotoxins in fresh fish and dried seafoods”, Journal of Chromatography A, vol. 1387, pp. 42-48.
Sun, W., Han, Z., Aerts, J., Nie, D., Jin, M., Shi, W., Zhao, Z., De Saeger, S., Zhao, Y. & Wu, A. 2015, “A reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of multiple mycotoxins in fresh fish and dried seafoods”, Journal of Chromatography A, vol. 1387, pp. 42-48.
Turner, N.W., Bramhmbhatt, H., Szabo-Vezse, M., Poma, A., Coker, R. & Piletsky, S.A. 2015, “Analytical methods for determination of mycotoxins: An update (2009-2014)”, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 901, pp. 12-33.
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Present your four references in the Harvarded6v9 style / RMIT Harvard (not EndNote’s Harvard) OR the APA 6th style.

Indicate whether you have selected the Harvarded6v9 style or the APA 6th style.

Only these two styles will be checked so you will be marked down if you use a different style.

Follow the range of examples given in the example reference lists below.

Quick guide:
• It is not necessary to use EndNote referencing software to complete this question. A Library Guide to the Harvarded6v9 style (referred to simply as Harvard) is available at the Referencing guides page and an example bibliography is also provided below.
• However EndNote software is extremely valuable to Honours, Masters by Research and PhD students as it automatically generates bibliographies. Check with your supervisor if you are not sure of its value to you.
• To get started with EndNote if you haven’t attended a class go to Working With Your Search Results: EndNote.
• Watch the training videos listed in the Online Tutorials box.
• Download the EndNote software to your computer via the link in the Download EndNote box.
• Via the same link, download the Harvarded6v9 EndNote style (EndNote X7 Exercise 2 –see below – provides instructions on where to save the file).
• Do not use the version of Harvard that comes with the EndNote software. EndNote’s Harvard presents author names in capitals which is not the style you require.
• Download and work through EndNote X7 Exercise 1.doc and EndNote X7 Exercise 2.doc available in the EndNote Help: Handouts box.
• For further assistance, contact your Liaison Librarian.

NOTE: It is not necessary to distinguish electronic versions from print versions of books or articles.

FINAL CHECK LIST TO AVOID LOSING MARKS

• Have you included all necessary screen captures? Answers will not be considered if they are not confirmed by the requested screen captures.

• Have you answered all parts of each question? Omissions will result in a low mark for the entire question.

• Does your reference list look like one of the examples given below (ie. APA or Harvarded6v9)? Only these two styles will be checked so you will be automatically marked down if you use a different style.
NOTE: All four references need to be in one style. Don’t switch between styles in the one reference list.
NOTE: The reference list needs to be arranged in alphabetical order (this also means – don’t number 1 – 4)

A range of examples in the Harvarded6v9 style:

Adams, MJ 2004, Chemometrics in analytical spectroscopy, 2nd edn, Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, England.
Barnard, AS, Russo, SP & Snook, IK 2006, ‘Modeling of stability and phase transformations in zero- and one- dimensional nanocarbon systems ‘, in M Rieth & W Schommers (eds), Handbook of theoretical and computational nanotechnology, American Scientific Publishers, Stevenson Ranch, Calif., vol. 9, pp. 573-622.
Bhargava, SK, Akolekar, DB & Foran, G 2007, ‘Investigations on gold nanoparticles supported on rare earth oxide catalytic materials’, Journal of Molecular Catalysis a-Chemical, vol. 267, no. 1-2, pp. 57-64.
Daivis, PJ, Matin, ML & Todd, BD 2007, ‘Nonlinear shear and elongational rheology of model polymer melts at low strain rates’, Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics, vol. 147, no. 1-2, pp. 35-44.
Davy, JL 2004, ‘Insulating buildings against transportation noise’, in DJ Mee, RJ Hooker & IDM Hillock (eds), Acoustics 2004 : transportation noise and vibration: the new millennium: proceedings of the annual conference of the Australian Acoustical Society, Australian Acoustical Society, Surfers Paradise, Australia.
Gupta, BB & Kasapis, S 1997, Water-continuous spread, US Patent 5,614,245.
Porter, N 1994, ‘The simultaneous determination of heavy metals using pH gradient FIA with fluorescence detection’, Ph.D. thesis, Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
Spencer, MJS & Morishita, T (eds) 2016, Silicene : structure, properties and applications, Springer, Switzerland.

A range of examples in the APA 6th style:

Adams, M. J. (2004). Chemometrics in analytical spectroscopy (2nd ed.). Cambridge, England: Royal Society of Chemistry.
Barnard, A. S., Russo, S. P., & Snook, I. K. (2006). Modeling of stability and phase transformations in zero- and one- dimensional nanocarbon systems In M. Rieth & W. Schommers (Eds.), Handbook of theoretical and computational nanotechnology (Vol. 9, pp. 573-622). Stevenson Ranch, CA: American Scientific Publishers.
Bhargava, S. K., Akolekar, D. B., & Foran, G. (2007). Investigations on gold nanoparticles supported on rare earth oxide catalytic materials. Journal of Molecular Catalysis a-Chemical, 267(1-2), 57-64. doi: 10.1016/j.molcata.2006.11.018
Daivis, P. J., Matin, M. L., & Todd, B. D. (2007). Nonlinear shear and elongational rheology of model polymer melts at low strain rates. Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics, 147(1-2), 35-44. doi: 10.1016/j.jnnfm.2007.06.005
Davy, J. L. (2004). Insulating buildings against transportation noise. In D. J. Mee, R. J. Hooker & I. D. M. Hillock (Eds.), Acoustics 2004 : transportation noise and vibration: the new millennium: proceedings of the annual conference of the Australian Acoustical Society. Surfers Paradise, Australia: Australian Acoustical Society.
Gupta, B. B., & Kasapis, S. (1997). U.S. Patent No. 5,614,245. Washington, DC: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
Mclean, J. E., & Bledsoe, B. E. (1992). Behavior of metals in soils (Vol. 2006). Washington, DC: United States Environmental Protection Agency.
Porter, N. (1994). The simultaneous determination of heavy metals using pH gradient FIA with fluorescence detection (Doctoral dissertation). Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
Spencer, M. J. S., & Morishita, T. (Eds.). (2016). Silicene : structure, properties and applications. Basel, Switzerland: Springer.

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